skip to Main Content

Virtuosity, presence of mind and wit

Süddeutsche Zeitung, Von Harald Eggebrecht

The division of history into periods is supposed to serve as a guide. And indeed, this also applies to music history. But if we zoom in on a particular time, let’s say the borderland period between Baroque and Classical, or Romantic and Modern, then the apparently stable boundaries between these monumental time blocks start becoming very permeable. So Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, arguably, is not just the very gifted son of the great Johann Sebastian, but becomes in his own right a highly strong-willed, imaginative composer, whose influence was felt for a long time.

At first, CPE Bach didn’t give a particular name to his [13] “Sonatas for Harpsichord or Pianoforte, accompanied by a Violin and a Violoncello” published in 1775-7. Sometimes he called them trios, or else sonatas or “trios (they are at the same time solos)”.

In any event, these extremely witty pieces, with sudden, feverish changes in harmony, rhythm and dynamics, mark the beginning of the piano trio genre. It is incomprehensible that this amazing music, so well characterised, remains so infrequently played.

The young Linos Piano Trio (Prach Boondiskulchok, piano; Konrad Elias-Trostmann, violin; Vladimir Waltham, cello) shows that virtuosity, presence of mind and wit are indispensable for this brilliant music. (Avi-Music)

Translated from the original German. 

You may also like to see...
Determination and vivacity from the winners

The Sydney Morning Herald, Clive O’Connell

Striking musicianship and impressive technical accomplishment

Concerts at Cratfield Website, John Sims

An astounding performance

Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung

Back To Top
21/10/2020